It’s a Kickstarter thing

I’ve been asked why I don’t have a direct link back to Kickstarter on my blog page, since I send everyone over here for a look, but then they can’t get back. It seems once there people don’t think of clicking on the FAQ’s or Update page to learn all the new going on, especially once they’ve made up their mind to become a Backer! So I’m giving a quick update here.

First of all, here’s the link: http://kck.st/GW4Yal – sorry but I have no clue how to put it on my page so it will be there like a really cool button or something… I’m a farmer not a techie! 😉

For an update on REWARDS we just did a major overhaul adding very, very snazzy rewards for tight budgets and one really cool very, very high end reward.

We have also answered some questions about the cheese classes (yes, they are transferable and make AWESOME gifts – if you gave me a ticket to a cheese class somewhere I would LOVE you!!). We clarified about shipping cheese and provided what we think is a pretty sweet solution (donating your cheese to our local, awesome food bank, Good Cheer www.goodcheer.org).

The question we answered today has come at us from a lot of angles, and I’m not sure if I answer it or just confuse matters worse. Maybe you can give me some feedback on it.

Here it is:

How does this Kickstarter thing work?

Kickstarter.com is a community funded project incubator. It’s also known as crowd source funding. This is a place for all the projects that don’t fall into the category of charities to raise money.

The way Kickstarter works is a person like me gets ambitious to do a project, or cut a cd, or produce a play, or self-publish a cookbook (see Lark’s amazing project here: http://kck.st/yt2i4J), or build a community farmers marketplace (like in Maine: http://kck.st/zXkFK4) or make some awesome cured meat products like another farmer in PA (http://kck.st/ya3g0i – I can’t WAIT to taste some of this with our cheese!). The person/entity with the dream may not have the ability to fund their project… and rather than just let it die for lack of conventional financing for myriad reasons, they choose to put together a Kickstarter Project and reach out to the community (both on local and world wide – you may be interested because it’s YOUR farmer, you may be interested because it’s a family farm on the other side of the world and you want to see more successful family farms – and less mono-crop agricultural conglomerates).

So, how does it really work? People like YOU decide a Project is important… or at least important enough to part with a few dollars. Enough people make a difference. Projects funds in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, often $10-25 at a time.

Another project I backed (http://kck.st/wlzN0Y) is a young lady that wants to go study cheese being made in Italy. I didn’t ever know of this person before stumbling upon her Kickstarter. I thought I would LOVE to do this, but I can’t – I’m too busy with my own dairy. But that doesn’t mean she shouldn’t get to, and for a few dollars that when push comes to shove I won’t even notice missing… I get to be a part of it. I get to help her go live one of my dreams… and that alone is worth it. Then, I started following her blog, and interacting with her, and getting excited for her… for less than a ‘movie night’ or even going out to lunch. Now, I get a Backer Reward from her too, a memento from our little shared experience. How cool.

But it’s ALL or NOTHING.

If a project doesn’t reach its funding goal by the time the clock runs out, no credit cards get charged, nobody gets any funding and the project is dead. You can try again, but I have watched a few try, their second and third attempts each getting less and less support than the original (I bet you can imagine why… I’m already a bit sick of talking about it, if everyone who wanted me to shut up would just pledge already… actually that isn’t even close to true – I’m so excited by this I do come up with a dozen posts a day that I COULD post, but restrain myself).

In our case, if it doesn’t fund, the project is on indefinite hold. We have more fencing and shelters and improvements to make here on the farm for the health of our herd. We won’t be able to develop what would be our community access portal… at least not for a few years.

But… if we get your help?! Your $10? Your $25? Your $500? We can do this, this year, and make our farm more sustainable by offering the classes people have been requesting and providing new cheeses for the palates to enjoy, and most importantly providing a connection between people and their food.

Did that answer your question?  Maybe not… try clicking on the ‘Pledge $xx or More’ button to the right that most closely fits the rewards you want or the budget you have… Kickstarter and Amazon have done the rest of the explaining and will walk you through it without all of the silly distractions I can’t help myself from putting in!

Oh, and we changed our starting image since the Kickstarter crew really seems to favor images with text in them! The image shows up a little different here.

Kickstarter Home Image

Kickstarter Home Image - one of my farmers in training!

Thanks for all of your support of our Kickstarter project. Being a part of someone’s dream coming to life is pretty amazing, and we are grateful to get to share our dream with you!

With grateful hearts,

The Whole Happy Herd at the Little Brown Farm

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About Chief Milkmaid

A former executive, now goatmilker and cheesemaker, I am the Chief Milkmaid of the Little Brown Farm.
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5 Responses to It’s a Kickstarter thing

  1. Tammy Malfatti says:

    We had a great time visiting with you & the herd on Sunday. Thank you for showing us around. My daughter had a blast! I do hope your project gets funded. Our pledge is in.

    • Thank you so much for your comment, and your pledge! We love having visitors to the farm, now that you know where we are I hope you’ll bring both your girls back time and time again as they grow! It was a great to meet you and your lovely family.

    • Thank you! It’s a good thing the goat babies needed their bottles or this would have been a 4-5 page post! 😉 I get so excited when I think of all the interesting opportunities. *sigh* deep breath… time to go get a few winks before the next bottles.

  2. Pingback: They say it takes a village… look at what these community members have done! | LittleBrownFarm

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